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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: deckeda
Date: April 19, 2021 12:34PM
Officially part of Team Double Jab today.
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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: wave rider
Date: April 19, 2021 01:25PM
Quote
deckeda
Officially part of Team Double Jab today.

ftw smiley



=wr=
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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: deckeda
Date: April 19, 2021 03:15PM
It’s somewhat fascinating to know that some hours into the near future I could feel sick. If I had to guess my situation right now, 5hrs later I’d say I might be a little fuzzy but not impaired or sick. The computer screen isn’t off-limits like it was after jab #1 for awhile.

Anyway, I’m not going to provide a play-by-play but it’s interesting to know “stuff is happening” inside your body right now that may not manifest until just a little later. Like that alien that burst through the guy’s gut in Alien during breakfast.

Maybe that’s not the best example. Back to work, now.
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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: Grateful11
Date: April 19, 2021 05:30PM
Had my first shot of Pfizer last Friday before noon. Came home and mowed the yard, felt fine. Sore arm started Friday evening. Saturday I felt a tad blah, had a slight headache. Sunday had a headache and was just a tad wobbly. Today I've felt really, really blah all day, even laid down in the bed and slept for two hours this afternoon. BP is a tad elevated at 158/78, I don't have BP issues, never have. I hope this goes away by tomorrow, got somethings I'd like to do while this cool weather hangs on all week, may hit 32 degrees Thursday morning. I'm only guessing that these are normal issues after the shot.

I find it odd that all the elderly, like 85 and up, I know didn't have any side effects at all.



Grateful11
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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: RgrF
Date: April 19, 2021 08:21PM
85 up probably doesn't have much immune system left to stimulate.
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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: Speedy
Date: April 19, 2021 10:05PM
Quote
RgrF
85 up probably doesn't have much immune system left to stimulate.

Untrue. It just takes a little more to get it up. Maybe a double dose.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Noted Norwegian COVID Conspiracy Theorist Dies of COVID.
Posted by: Fritz
Date: April 20, 2021 04:13PM
[www.dailykos.com]

Noted Norwegian COVID Conspiracy Theorist Dies of COVID.

read the comments.



!#$@@$#!

If there are spelling issues, please pardon, Owen the cat is standing or sleeping on my keyboard.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/20/2021 04:14PM by Fritz.
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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: Yoyodyne ArtWorks
Date: April 21, 2021 05:08PM
Monty Python unites the world, yet again.



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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: Acer
Date: April 26, 2021 01:33PM
Only a sore arm from Pfizer #2. I was a little disappointed I didn't have at least a little more reaction as I was hoping to play that card to get out of something I did not want to do. First world problems.
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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: rjmacs
Date: May 17, 2021 10:04AM
As of last Thursday, I am fully immunized (Pfizer). Still wearing masks indoors outside the home, but feel much more comfortable in public spaces these days.



rj
AKA
Vreemac, Moth of the Future
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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: Speedy
Date: May 17, 2021 11:01AM
Quote
rjmacs
As of last Thursday, I am fully immunized (Pfizer). Still wearing masks indoors outside the home, but feel much more comfortable in public spaces these days.

Congrats. Enjoy your new found freedumb. Seriously, I don’t wear a mask now anywhere it isn’t required.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: May 17, 2021 05:14PM
Quote
rjmacs
As of last Thursday, I am fully immunized (Pfizer). Still wearing masks indoors outside the home, but feel much more comfortable in public spaces these days.

Congrats!!
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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: TheCaber
Date: May 20, 2021 12:21PM
Received Moderna#2 on 1 May, stayed housebound until 15 May, and will be masking when out and about (especially in public accessible buildings, stores, crowds, etc.).

Time to go discipline the lawn. I asked nicely, but the dandelions refused to trim themselves.



=TC
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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: deckeda
Date: June 21, 2021 06:31PM
So right now we’re navigating the local Burger King’s dining room, at my son’s request. It’s like 90% of the tables are verboten with a red placard denoting the table will wiped down “soon.” And 4-5 of those additionally have yellow “police tape” across them, like maybe someone died at each one.

We picked green placards denoting a clean table, but um, they all look alike from the soda stains.
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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: deckeda
Date: June 21, 2021 06:43PM
And it’s like 50 degrees in here. I realized the placards only indicate a “clean” or “dirty” table of the last patron turned over the card.
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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: Speedy
Date: June 21, 2021 10:31PM
Touch is a rare method of transmission.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: Anthony
Date: June 23, 2021 10:27AM
Jansen one shot 2 days ago. Fever, chills, etc. overnight. Morning of second day, feeling great.



Thousands of candles can be lit from a single candle, and the life of the candle will not be shortened. Happiness never decreases by being shared. - Buddha...

anthonysalvo.com
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Re: All COVID-19 Discussion GOES HERE
Posted by: deckeda
Date: July 03, 2021 11:02AM
^^ good on ya
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How the hunt for this deadly virus shaped the search for coronavirus’s origins
Posted by: Speedy
Date: October 18, 2021 08:42PM
An interesting read; a bit of a detective story.

[www.washingtonpost.com]

In late 1998, it got it. The virus arrived in central Malaysia by air, inside furry bats that alighted on the boughs of fruit trees swaying over pig farms. The bats, messy eaters, dropped their half-consumed meals. The swine, undiscerning eaters, gobbled up the leftovers. The virus, ready to move, hopped into the pigs and passed through their coughs to the humans who worked with them.

And within eight months, 105 Malaysians — about 40 percent of those infected — had died of this novel virus, dubbed Nipah, after suffering through fevers, brain inflammation and comas.

Scientists would piece together this chain of events, identify the virus and trace it to its origins in fruit bats over the years that followed — quickly for this sort of disease investigation. It took solid hunches, luck and painstaking detective work. That work is ongoing: Nipah erupts annually in Bangladesh, where it kills people at an even greater rate. It also occasionally infects people in India, where a 12-year-old boy died of the virus in September. There is no vaccine or cure.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: How the hunt for this deadly virus shaped the search for coronavirus’s origins
Posted by: deckeda
Date: October 19, 2021 09:14AM
^^

I’m rethinking the need for bacon and ham. And bats. Mostly bats.
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Orphaned Children – More than 140,000 U.S. Children Lost a Primary or Secondary Caregiver Due to the COVID-19 Pandemic
Posted by: Speedy
Date: October 25, 2021 09:45PM
Slightly dated:

[www.cdc.gov]

October 7, 2021
One U.S. child loses a parent or caregiver for every four COVID-19-associated deaths, a new modeling studyexternal icon published today in Pediatrics reveals. The findings illustrate orphanhood as a hidden and ongoing secondary tragedy caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and emphasizes that identifying and caring for these children throughout their development is a necessary and urgent part of the pandemic response – both for as long as the pandemic continues, as well as in the post-pandemic era.

From April 1, 2020 through June 30, 2021, data suggest that more than 140,000 children under age 18 in the United States lost a parent, custodial grandparent, or grandparent caregiver who provided the child’s home and basic needs, including love, security, and daily care. Overall, the study shows that approximately 1 out of 500 children in the United States has experienced COVID-19-associated orphanhood or death of a grandparent caregiver. There were racial, ethnic, and geographic disparities in COVID-19-associated death of caregivers: children of racial and ethnic minorities accounted for 65% of those who lost a primary caregiver due to the pandemic.

Children’s lives are permanently changed by the loss of a mother, father, or grandparent who provided their homes, basic needs, and care. Loss of a parent is among the adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) linked to mental health problems; shorter schooling; lower self-esteem; sexual risk behaviors; and increased risk of substance abuse, suicide, violence, sexual abuse, and exploitation.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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List of medicines/products tied to fetal cells
Posted by: Speedy
Date: October 25, 2021 10:06PM
I’m too lazy to type the list.





Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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A cheap antidepressant lowers the risk of COVID45 hospitalization, a large study finds
Posted by: Speedy
Date: October 28, 2021 06:09AM
[www.nytimes.com]

A large clinical trial has found that a common and inexpensive antidepressant lowered the odds that high-risk Covid-19 patients would be hospitalized. The results, published on Wednesday, could open the door to new guidelines for the drug’s use both in the United States and globally.

The drug, fluvoxamine, has been safely prescribed for nearly 30 years as a treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder. But when the coronavirus started spreading, researchers were drawn to the medication because of its ability to reduce inflammation, potentially allowing it to quell the body’s overwhelming response to a coronavirus infection.

Several smaller studies of fluvoxamine earlier in the pandemic showed promising results, but none was as large or persuasive as the one published on Wednesday by a group of researchers in Canada, the United States and Brazil, outside scientists said. Among nearly 1,500 Covid patients in Brazil given either fluvoxamine or a placebo, the drug reduced the need for hospitalization or prolonged medical observation by one-third, the study found. It was published in The Lancet Global Health.

Some patients struggled to tolerate the drug and stopped taking it, the study said, raising a question among outside scientists about whether they had yet identified the ideal dose. But among those who had largely followed doctors’ orders, the benefits were even more striking. In those patients, the drug reduced the need for hospitalization by two-thirds and slashed the risk of dying: One Covid patient given fluvoxamine died, compared with 12 given a placebo.

“That’s really good,” said Dr. David Boulware, an infectious disease scientist at the University of Minnesota who worked on a smaller, real-world study of the drug in Covid patients in California. Plus, he added, “it’s not a shiny new, expensive drug. The nice thing about this is it has a known safety profile.”

Beyond proper dosing, the study left other questions unresolved, scientists said. Penny Ward, a visiting professor in pharmaceutical medicine at King’s College London, noted that part of the drug’s benefit appeared to come from reducing the need for extended medical observation, which the study tracked alongside hospital admissions. And most patients in the study were unvaccinated, Professor Ward said, so it’s unclear how well the drug would work in the vaccinated.

The new study, coming nearly a year after smaller trials of the drug, was a reminder of the difficulty that many researchers have had running large tests of Covid treatments. The Biden administration has made more funding available for such trials, scientists said, but enrolling enough patients has only gotten more difficult: Most high-risk Americans are vaccinated, and vaccine-averse people may be less likely to participate in trials.

Because fluvoxamine is already approved for treating O.C.D., doctors can already prescribe it “off label” for Covid. But Dr. Boulware said that prescriptions of the drug had increased only slightly during the pandemic, unlike other repurposed drugs with far less scientific support, like hydroxychloroquine and ivermectin.

“It hasn’t really gotten any cult following,” he said.

Federal treatment guidelines say that larger trials are necessary to evaluate the use of fluvoxamine for Covid, and scientists said they expected those recommendations to change on the basis of the new study.

The new findings are also expected to boost the popularity of the drug in less wealthy countries: A 10-day course of the drug costs about $4.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: A cheap antidepressant lowers the risk of COVID45 hospitalization, a large study finds
Posted by: Filliam H. Muffman
Date: October 28, 2021 05:03PM
$4 versus $700 is a huge improvement. I hope long term studies show it's one of the best options to undercut prices of other treatments.



In tha 360. MRF User Map
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Re: A cheap antidepressant lowers the risk of COVID45 hospitalization, a large study finds
Posted by: rgG
Date: October 29, 2021 02:10PM
I saw something about fluvoxamine last night. Thanks for posting as I was just about to Google it.
I wondered what mechanism it used and think it is interesting that it is an anti inflammatory is very interesting.





Roswell, GA (Atlanta suburb)
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Re: A cheap antidepressant lowers the risk of COVID45 hospitalization, a large study finds
Posted by: deckeda
Date: November 08, 2021 10:20AM
A good read:

This is a WaPo story but made available locally: [www.spokesman.com]

This small hospital was faced with a nearly 50-50 split on getting staffers vaxxed.

This nurse knows on some level she’s on the wrong side of history:

“You could have made this a lot easier by being an a—hole,” she said.
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Re: A cheap antidepressant lowers the risk of COVID45 hospitalization, a large study finds
Posted by: Speedy
Date: November 08, 2021 10:24AM
Quote
deckeda
A good read:

This is a WaPo story but made available locally: [www.spokesman.com]

This small hospital was faced with a nearly 50-50 split on getting staffers vaxxed.

This nurse knows on some level she’s on the wrong side of history:

“You could have made this a lot easier by being an a—hole,” she said.

It was a good read (in the WaPo.) The nurse, a supervisor, was whacked-out on fringe media. She was completely brainwashed. Good riddance. I hope she enjoys her retirement where she is less likely to hurt sick people.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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The bewildering ordeal of getting billed for a coronavirus vaccine
Posted by: Speedy
Date: November 09, 2021 06:32PM
[www.washingtonpost.com]

Raising three kids, Heather Christena Schmidt has learned a lot about emergency rooms. “Kids are always, you know, getting into stuff,” she says. So when the first puzzling bill arrived, she knew it wouldn’t be the last.

Schmidt’s 13-year-old daughter, Ava, got her second dose of the Moderna coronavirus vaccine on June 22. After her first dose, administered in May at a CVS, Ava fainted. The reason remains elusive. So her primary care doctor recommended she get the second dose at an emergency room, where she could be treated immediately if anything went wrong.

Nothing did; Ava was in and out of the hospital near the Schmidts’ home in Camarillo, Calif., in less than a half-hour. But Schmidt has received three separate bills for her daughter’s shot that day — one from the hospital system, one from insurance and one from the doctor who administered the shot — totaling $262.50.

We were told from the beginning that they would be free, these vaccines. The official webpage for the government’s vaccine rollout reads, in large bold print, “COVID-19 vaccines are free to all people living in the United States, regardless of their immigration or health insurance status,” paid for via federal funding and partnerships with insurance companies. President Donald Trump said they were free. President Biden said they were free. For most Americans, it’s been uncomplicated: They’re free.

Nevertheless, a tiny subset of Americans have gotten billed anyway, some in small, annoying-on-principle amounts, others in more alarming denominations. Some have seen their bills quickly disappear after a phone call, waved away as errors. Others — Schmidt, for example — have found themselves in long, unpleasant games of telephone, stuck with the difficult choice between paying for a shot or jeopardizing their credit scores, putting our bewildering system on full, vexing display.

I should admit here that I was charged for my coronavirus vaccine — $567, in fact. And initially, I wondered whether that was my karmic penalty for getting it early.

On March 6, I had already spent weeks obsessively checking for updates on when I, an otherwise healthy 31-year-old with asthma, would qualify in my home state of New Jersey. So when a friend texted me that he’d heard the Jersey City Medical Center nearby was handing out doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine that had been approved just days before, I dropped everything and leaped into my car. When I arrived, I told the front desk why I was there. A security officer pointed me toward the emergency department.

Claire Fallon, a freelance writer based in Jersey City, found out about the shots from the same mutual friend. Fallon, 33, sat just a few feet away from me in the waiting room; she told me later that at the time, she had recently joined her husband’s insurance but didn’t have a card yet. She and the nurse on duty decided she would simply be categorized as an “uninsured.”

The first bill — from the hospital network, RWJBarnabas Health — showed up about two months later. Like mine, Fallon’s was for $567, but hers came with an “uninsured discount adjustment” down to $73.71. Fallon later received an additional bill from the Jersey City Medical Center for $251.58.

When Fallon called the number on her second bill, the agent said “she would put a hold on it until we figured out what was going on,” Fallon remembers. “That was the last I heard of it.” Fallon still worries, months later, about that outstanding bill.

I’m not proud of it: I ignored my bill. Right up until I got a phone call reminding me to pay it in June while I was vacationing. Flustered, I told the agent on the phone that I didn’t think I needed to pay $567 for a free vaccine. In September, I got a new bill from RWJBarnabas: A “covid-19 adjustment” brought the total down to $225.39. On Oct. 11, I called them to ask why I was still being charged; the representative told me he would send my bill out for review, and acknowledged that I “shouldn’t have to pay anything.” As of Nov. 3, it was still under review.

RWJBarnabas said in a statement to The Washington Post that it “does not charge patients for the vaccine. Vaccine administration is billed to insurers. However, patients who receive medical screenings in our emergency department are billed for the emergency room visit, as is customary.” (Although that’s where the vaccinations took place, I received no other medical treatment.)

Laurie Todd, based in Kirkland, Wash., does business as “the Insurance Warrior,” writing appeals for clients with far weightier problems, such as when their lifesaving treatments are denied insurance coverage or deemed out-of-network. As a result, she hasn’t dealt with any bills for coronavirus vaccines, she notes, but if she did, she would skip phoning a billing office and go straight to an executive at whatever clinic, pharmacy or insurance company sent the bill — via email.

“Attach a copy of the bill. Point out to them that … vaccinations are free to all citizens,” she told The Post in an email.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: The bewildering ordeal of getting billed for a coronavirus vaccine
Posted by: deckeda
Date: November 09, 2021 08:53PM
Freakin bureaucracy. Systemic incompetence. The “free” vaccine was always suspect. Do you have insurance? OK we’ll have you fill out all this stuff. Don’t have insurance? Uh OK here’s your jab.

One of my brothers in law just did that. Told them he has no insurance (he does) and sailed through in a few minutes at a CVS.

Of course, it depends on where you go. The pharmacies always want to know. But back when the county was doling them out while you sat in your car at the fairgrounds there was none of that. We did fill out some very basic info online but it was about eligibility, not our insurance.
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Re: The bewildering ordeal of getting billed for a coronavirus vaccine
Posted by: Speedy
Date: November 09, 2021 10:12PM
Our employer-provided health insurance comes straight out of our health savings account until we reach a deductible limit, not something I wanted to happen. But I used my Part A Medicare (the only Medicare part I have) number to get the jab.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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