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Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: rgG
Date: September 03, 2021 07:46AM
I don’t understand how, with HIPPA laws, people, other than a patient and her doctor, can know what procedure a person has and how far along a woman was in her pregnancy?
How can you compel a person or her doctor to reveal her medical history to some stranger?





Roswell, GA (Atlanta suburb)
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: August West
Date: September 03, 2021 08:50AM
Great question.



Apologies to the anonymous forum member affected by my previous sig pic. It was my personal pic of a country expressing great grief as their leader, one of the most recognized people in the world, lay on his deathbed 8 years ago, days before he died. Like a naif, I did not realize it was offensively political, I considered it an expression of deep emotion and a reminder of the mortal coil's nature; that we all, great and small, can only hope to make a difference in our short time here, no matter the personal cost.

I'll post another pic from my work in South Africa that is, hopefully, apolitical.

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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: pdq
Date: September 03, 2021 08:54AM
I think the predominant plan is just to shut down abortion access. All you need is a pregnant woman past 7 weeks who pretends to be seeking abortion, or finding one woman who has second thoughts after an abortion beyond 7 weeks, and an enterprising lawyer or layman can sue each and every person in the clinic for $10K apiece, plus any of their court costs. Given the political climate and the folks in charge in Texas, clinics could easily be wiped out if they make one false move. I would guess insurance companies wouldn’t touch the clinic or those that work there if they had even one event like this.

Practically, this largely eliminates abortion access in the state. If your monthly period doesn’t come on time, you’re already at 4 weeks. You have 2, maybe 3 weeks to get a pregnancy test (which may or may not be positive at first), arrange a visit at one of a shrinking number of widely dispersed clinics, and then actually set a date to come back and have an abortion. I would imagine the clinics have to perform ultrasound (and perhaps intravaginal ultrasound*) to look for any detectable heart activity in the 1/5” long embryo, and if they see anything, they have to cancel the procedure and send you back home or risk the existence of the entire clinic.

*Edit: the Wikipedia page on the new law indeed specifies intravaginal (“transvaginal”) ultrasound:

Quote

The act allows any person to sue someone who provides abortion care once a signal of "cardiac motion" in an embryo can be detected via transvaginal ultrasound…

Spread em, ma’am. The State’s gotta know exactly what’s inside ya (besides the ultrasound probe).



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/03/2021 09:45AM by pdq.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Sarcany
Date: September 03, 2021 09:08AM
[webservices.sos.state.tx.us]

This is one of the most insidious parts of the law.

The person liable for aiding the abortion must do so knowingly, but "knowing" includes "known or should have known."

This leaves a very VERY wide open door for lawsuits. An Uber driver drives a young woman to a clinic that performs a wide range of family planning and prenatal care and abortions. Since they perform abortions, a Texas judge might conclude that the driver should have known that there was a likelihood that the woman would have an abortion.

A reasoning person would probably see that the Uber driver would have no way of making that determination. But the driver would have to defend him/herself in court to get that far. The out of pocket legal costs might bankrupt him/her.

So Uber drivers will not drive people to health-clinics because the risk of personal loss is too great.

Thus, access to care for an entire class of women who can't afford private health care is removed.



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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: pdq
Date: September 03, 2021 09:21AM
Of course, the crazies are enthusiastically starting up tip lines and web sites where folks can turn in anyone they suspect might be pregnant.

From the WaPo:

Quote

[Bob] Lehman, a board member of Pro-Life Waco, predicted that fathers and other relatives will report abortions obtained by female relatives, unhappy that their daughters or sisters chose not to continue their pregnancies.

secret smiley

Edit: same guy:

Quote

Planned Parenthood affiliates sometimes attend his organization’s events, he said — and he can imagine Pro-Life Waco sending their own plants into the clinic. “If you want to strike at the head of the snake, you go to the abortion facility,” he said.

Because, you know, attending a public event is basically the same as spying on patients in doctor’s offices.

HIPAA? What’s that?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/03/2021 09:25AM by pdq.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: GGD
Date: September 03, 2021 09:26AM
Quote
Sarcany
This leaves a very VERY wide open door for lawsuits. An Uber driver drives a young woman to a clinic that performs a wide range of family planning and prenatal care and abortions. Since they perform abortions, a Texas judge might conclude that the driver should have known that there was a likelihood that the woman would have an abortion.

I'm expecting to see an uptick in the number of requests to be taken to the Starbucks across the street from the clinic.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: rgG
Date: September 03, 2021 09:31AM
Quote
GGD
Quote
Sarcany
This leaves a very VERY wide open door for lawsuits. An Uber driver drives a young woman to a clinic that performs a wide range of family planning and prenatal care and abortions. Since they perform abortions, a Texas judge might conclude that the driver should have known that there was a likelihood that the woman would have an abortion.

I'm expecting to see an uptick in the number of requests to be taken to the Starbucks across the street from the clinic.

I was thinking of that, too.
But seriously, this is nuts. I mean completely nuts. The courts are already overwhelmed with frivolous lawsuits and now they want to flood the courts with this Handmaid’s Tale kind of crap.
WTF?

I think the real plan is to close the clinics because of the fear of lawsuits, rather than actually have all the lawsuits, and that’s low, really low.





Roswell, GA (Atlanta suburb)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/03/2021 09:33AM by rgG.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: cbelt3
Date: September 03, 2021 10:15AM
I'm waiting for the tips about Trumplican politicians paying for their girlfriend's abortions getting 'ignored'. And the tipper suing the state as a result. Because I can double dog guarantee that that has happened quite often.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: numbered
Date: September 03, 2021 10:42AM
The 'fear of lawsuits' is the point. The legal system is so expensive that no one can risk having the accusation made.

The thing is, what other behaviors might be subject to vigilante-style enforcement? What might blue states do, and then say to Alito, 'sauce for the goose'?

WCGW?

The abortion issue is devastating. But the concept of vigilante enforcement may do more damage in the long haul...
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: September 03, 2021 10:47AM
What rgG said.

This law is aimed at providers and counselors, not women patients. And HIPPA only applies to providers and insurance companies. If I know your health info and share it, HIPPA doesn't apply to me.

So providers have stopped doing most procedures out of fear of being sued, which was the goal of the law. Harassment of providers.

Doctors across the border in Oklahoma are already taking extra shifts.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: RAMd®d
Date: September 03, 2021 11:18AM
Given the climate, I think getting a jury to believe the driver 'should have known' might not be much of a challenge.

It doesn't even matter there's a conviction (ok, it would matter to the driver) but even a successful defense would cost the drive big time.





Your boos mean nothing to me, I've seen what you cheer for.

Insisting on your rights without acknowledging your responsibilities isn’t freedom, it’s adolescence.

We are a government of laws, not men.

Everybody matters or nobody matters.

When a good man is hurt,
all who would be called good
must suffer with him.

You and I have memories longer than the road that stretches out ahead.

There is no safety for honest men except
by believing all possible evil of evil men.

We don’t do focus groups. They just ensure that you don’t offend anyone, and produce bland inoffensive products. —Sir Jonathan Ive

An armed society is a polite society.
And hope is a lousy defense.

You make me pull, I'll put you down.

I *love* SIGs. It's Glocks I hate.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: pdq
Date: September 03, 2021 11:32AM
Quote
numbered
The 'fear of lawsuits' is the point. The legal system is so expensive that no one can risk having the accusation made.

The thing is, what other behaviors might be subject to vigilante-style enforcement? What might blue states do, and then say to Alito, 'sauce for the goose’

Easy. Allow individuals to sue gun companies and the store/people who sold them when a gun is used in a crime. You don’t even have to be harmed at all by the crime! And if you win, the defendants pay your court costs.

But that’s a constitutional right! Yeah, so was the right of a woman to make reproductive decisions for herself before fetal viability.

Is this really where you want this to go, Mr. Alito?
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: mattkime
Date: September 03, 2021 11:54AM
I really do think that there should be a similar 2nd amendment law put on the books. But I suspect that the supreme court would strike it down. Build jurisprudence on THAT.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Diana
Date: September 03, 2021 01:00PM
Quote
rgG
Quote
GGD
Quote
Sarcany
This leaves a very VERY wide open door for lawsuits. An Uber driver drives a young woman to a clinic that performs a wide range of family planning and prenatal care and abortions. Since they perform abortions, a Texas judge might conclude that the driver should have known that there was a likelihood that the woman would have an abortion.

I'm expecting to see an uptick in the number of requests to be taken to the Starbucks across the street from the clinic.

I was thinking of that, too.
But seriously, this is nuts. I mean completely nuts. The courts are already overwhelmed with frivolous lawsuits and now they want to flood the courts with this Handmaid’s Tale kind of crap.
WTF?

I think the real plan is to close the clinics because of the fear of lawsuits, rather than actually have all the lawsuits, and that’s low, really low.

Yes. Close the clinics. They don’t actually have to be sued as the fear of the lawsuits will be enough, along with the cancellation of the clinic’s insurance, the protests in front of the clinic, etc. Harass them into extinction. This is the plan.

It will get to the point that a woman will be afraid to get a cup of coffee: you know, she could be pregnant and caffeine is not good for the baby. Any other action? She could be pregnant! The baby! Especially since a woman may not show until how many weeks? Pity those women who aren’t pregnant, but rather “heavy set” and may just look it.

I’m glad I moved out of that state. I will not be back.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: hal
Date: September 03, 2021 01:16PM
It will be interesting to see what happens when a well-connected teen is caught getting an abortion.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/03/2021 01:26PM by hal.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: GGD
Date: September 03, 2021 01:25PM
Quote
mattkime
I really do think that there should be a similar 2nd amendment law put on the books. But I suspect that the supreme court would strike it down. Build jurisprudence on THAT.

Or maybe skip Firearms and start with one of the other two things the ATF oversees, Alcohol or Tobacco. They're less partisan and will piss off a lot more people to call for an end of these types of laws.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Ted King
Date: September 03, 2021 01:47PM
Quote
GGD
Quote
mattkime
I really do think that there should be a similar 2nd amendment law put on the books. But I suspect that the supreme court would strike it down. Build jurisprudence on THAT.

Or maybe skip Firearms and start with one of the other two things the ATF oversees, Alcohol or Tobacco. They're less partisan and will piss off a lot more people to call for an end of these types of laws.

The problem with alcohol or tobacco is that there is no Constitutional right to partake of those whereas by Supreme Court precedence guns and abortions have been ruled as Constitutional rights by the Supreme Court.



e pluribus unum
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: p8712
Date: September 03, 2021 01:57PM
I could use $10K...samintx, look out!

Seriously, this law is terrible, and doing it's est to distract form the massive loss of voting rights in TX that went into effect at the same time.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Buzz
Date: September 03, 2021 02:22PM
I don't know about TX law, but in many states a "prevailing party is entitled to attorney's fees and court costs..." statute, has to be bilateral. So the Uber driver may not be SOL. It just seems that on the face of it, this Anti-Roe law has lots of flaws and should be enjoined/overturned. The scary thing is SCOTUS's ignorant conduct, and the likelihood of other states trying to copy TX. Listen to Joe, this has to be taken care of ASAP.
==
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Janit
Date: September 03, 2021 02:33PM
Quote
Lemon Drop
What rgG said.

This law is aimed at providers and counselors, not women patients. And HIPPA only applies to providers and insurance companies. If I know your health info and share it, HIPPA doesn't apply to me.

So providers have stopped doing most procedures out of fear of being sued, which was the goal of the law. Harassment of providers.

Doctors across the border in Oklahoma are already taking extra shifts.

Call it what it is: domestic terrorism!
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: September 03, 2021 03:01PM
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Racer X
Date: September 03, 2021 03:19PM
Quote
GGD
Quote
mattkime
I really do think that there should be a similar 2nd amendment law put on the books. But I suspect that the supreme court would strike it down. Build jurisprudence on THAT.

Or maybe skip Firearms and start with one of the other two things the ATF oversees, Alcohol or Tobacco. They're less partisan and will piss off a lot more people to call for an end of these types of laws.

far more alcohol related deaths in the us than from firearms, and it isn't protected by the constitution. but there is too much tax revenue from booze.

I really think this whole situation, all the way up to the supreme court, is crazy.



********************************************
The police have no duty to respond. See Castle Rock v. Gonzales, 545 U.S. 748 (2005) or Warren v. District of Columbia[1] (444 A.2d. 1, D.C. Ct. of Ap. 1981)
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Ted King
Date: September 03, 2021 03:38PM
Quote
Buzz
I don't know about TX law, but in many states a "prevailing party is entitled to attorney's fees and court costs..." statute, has to be bilateral. So the Uber driver may not be SOL. It just seems that on the face of it, this Anti-Roe law has lots of flaws and should be enjoined/overturned. The scary thing is SCOTUS's ignorant conduct, and the likelihood of other states trying to copy TX. Listen to Joe, this has to be taken care of ASAP.
==

This Texas abortion law specifically exempts people who bring lawsuits against abortion assisters from having to pay the legal fees if they lose the lawsuit. And that law further goes so far as to say there is no penalty for losing a series of frivolous lawsuits - basically gives a free pass for harassing clinics and such into financial oblivion by having to defend themselves against the lawsuits no matter the lack of legal merits of the suits.



e pluribus unum



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 09/03/2021 03:40PM by Ted King.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Acer
Date: September 03, 2021 03:55PM
Somebody's got to pay those court costs, so it must be the State of Texas. Apparently they think that's a better use of funds than wasting it on the children after they are born.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: p8712
Date: September 03, 2021 04:28PM
Quote
Acer
Somebody's got to pay those court costs, so it must be the State of Texas. Apparently they think that's a better use of funds than wasting it on the children after they are born.

Or keeping them from freezing to death.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: September 03, 2021 05:01PM
So Lyft and Uber have said they will pay legal fees for any driver sued under this law.

Go Daddy has said it will shut down the website of Texas Right to Life for violating their terms of service.

Waiting to hear from all the Fortune 500 companies HQed in Texas, who employ tens of thousands of women in state.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: JoeH
Date: September 03, 2021 06:26PM
Quote
Lemon Drop
So Lyft and Uber have said they will pay legal fees for any driver sued under this law.

Go Daddy has said it will shut down the website of Texas Right to Life for violating their terms of service.

Waiting to hear from all the Fortune 500 companies HQed in Texas, who employ tens of thousands of women in state.

Web site for reporting people in Texas for this is registered to an IP for Sucuri, which tracks back to Go Daddy who bought it in 2017. So that could quickly shut down www.Prolifewhistleblower.Com until they get another provider.

Edit: Things moving quickly, Go Daddy already has acted, RgrF posted already - [forums.macresource.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/03/2021 06:39PM by JoeH.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: RgrF
Date: September 03, 2021 06:33PM
Texas law apparently also limits the number of ****** a woman can own.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: GGD
Date: September 03, 2021 08:15PM
I wonder if every one of the people who were involved in creating this law have squeaky clean tax returns. Maybe some questionable campaign finance transactions? Tip lines aren't new, the IRS has one (actually a form, this is the IRS we're talking about), and another form to claim a reward ("bounty").

[www.irs.gov]
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: pdq
Date: September 03, 2021 08:18PM
A state judge steps in where SCOTUS fears to tread:

Quote

A Texas state judge on Friday temporarily blocked an anti-abortion group from enforcing Texas's new 6-week abortion ban against Planned Parenthood, handing a narrow legal victory to abortion rights advocates.

Judge Maya Guerra Gamble's (D) ruling does not invalidate the new law but rather halts Texas Right to Life and its associates from suing abortion providers and workers at Planned Parenthood clinics under the statute, S.B. 8, that took effect Wednesday.

“The Court finds that S.B. 8 creates a probable, irreparable, and imminent injury in the interim for which plaintiffs and their physicians, staff and patients throughout Texas have no adequate remedy at law if plaintiffs, their physicians, and staff are subjected to private enforcement lawsuits against them under S.B. 8,” Gamble wrote.

patriot smiley
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: GGD
Date: September 03, 2021 08:31PM
Quote
p8712
I could use $10K...samintx, look out!

Seriously, this law is terrible, and doing it's est to distract form the massive loss of voting rights in TX that went into effect at the same time.

This and the hurricane seem to have wiped Afghanistan out of the headlines.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: DeusxMac
Date: September 03, 2021 11:01PM
HIPA doesn't shield "criminal" activity.
Example: a psychiatrist MUST report to authorities, a patient who is a danger to the public.

If the "law" classifies an abortion as illegal, it cannot be held to be privileged information.



Caveat; I'm not a lawyer, this is just my understanding of HIPA.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: N-OS X-tasy!
Date: September 04, 2021 01:42AM
Quote
pdq
A state judge steps in where SCOTUS fears to tread:

Quote

A Texas state judge on Friday temporarily blocked an anti-abortion group from enforcing Texas's new 6-week abortion ban against Planned Parenthood, handing a narrow legal victory to abortion rights advocates.

Judge Maya Guerra Gamble's (D) ruling does not invalidate the new law but rather halts Texas Right to Life and its associates from suing abortion providers and workers at Planned Parenthood clinics under the statute, S.B. 8, that took effect Wednesday.

“The Court finds that S.B. 8 creates a probable, irreparable, and imminent injury in the interim for which plaintiffs and their physicians, staff and patients throughout Texas have no adequate remedy at law if plaintiffs, their physicians, and staff are subjected to private enforcement lawsuits against them under S.B. 8,” Gamble wrote.

patriot smiley

Called it: [forums.macresource.com]



It is what it is.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: space-time
Date: September 04, 2021 07:41AM
what if you drive someone out of state? can you still be sued?
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: p8712
Date: September 04, 2021 08:00AM
Quote
space-time
what if you drive someone out of state? can you still be sued?

Only if someone has an unsubstantiated belief that you went out of state for an abortion.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: pdq
Date: September 04, 2021 08:23AM
Quote
space-time
what if you drive someone out of state? can you still be sued?

A good question, and one I haven’t seen an answer to yet. How about suing American Airlines and all its employees for flying a state resident out for the purposes of abortion?
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: DeusxMac
Date: September 04, 2021 08:57AM
Quote
rgG
I don’t understand how, with HIPPA laws, people, other than a patient and her doctor, can know what procedure a person has and how far along a woman was in her pregnancy?
How can you compel a person or her doctor to reveal her medical history to some stranger?

HIPPA would not apply if a "law" was being, or to be, broken.

Example: Psychiatrists are required to inform authorities if they believe one of their clients is planning, and would have the opportunity to harm someone.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Ted King
Date: September 04, 2021 10:31AM
Quote
space-time
what if you drive someone out of state? can you still be sued?

From a transcript of a PBS Newshour segment:

[www.pbs.org]


Quote

John Yang:

Are there efforts to get people, to get women who are seeking abortions, to get them out of state, to get procedures done elsewhere?

Ashley Lopez:

Yes, that is something that has been widely reported, which is that there are group — there abortion clinics in New Mexico, for example, ready and willing to take these patients.

I think what's important to remember is that that also could be a very small amount of women, small number of women who are able to drive out of state to get those services. Texas is bordered by largely conservative states, for the exception of New Mexico. Louisiana is not a place where it's easy to get an abortion.

So, depending where you drive, this could be nine hours for some people. Texas is a big state. So, depending where you live in the state, it could be an almost insurmountable barrier to get over.

But, yes, that is one of the options women have, if they find themselves in a situation where they're past that six-week mark.



e pluribus unum
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: September 04, 2021 11:18AM
Like everything, the burden falls on low income women. Wealthy women can get what they need regardless of where they live.
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Ted King
Date: September 04, 2021 11:46AM
Quote
Lemon Drop
Like everything, the burden falls on low income women. Wealthy women can get what they need regardless of where they live.

I found a couple of Texas non-profits that say they provide low income women with transportation for getting an abortion but they are both small outfits and I couldn't find any reliable information about how well they use donations. I wish I could find such an outfit that is known to use a big proportion of their resources to help those for whom the non-profit is set up to help (rather than a lot of the money going to administration and fundraising) because I would really like to give money for poor women who want an abortion to get one in spite of the new Texas law.



e pluribus unum
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Lemon Drop
Date: September 04, 2021 06:07PM
Quote
Ted King
Quote
Lemon Drop
Like everything, the burden falls on low income women. Wealthy women can get what they need regardless of where they live.

I found a couple of Texas non-profits that say they provide low income women with transportation for getting an abortion but they are both small outfits and I couldn't find any reliable information about how well they use donations. I wish I could find such an outfit that is known to use a big proportion of their resources to help those for whom the non-profit is set up to help (rather than a lot of the money going to administration and fundraising) because I would really like to give money for poor women who want an abortion to get one in spite of the new Texas law.

This is one good list. I've heard of many of them but haven't looked at 990s or anything like that on the smaller ones.

These orgs have a variety of missions and approaches but are all centered on womens reproductive rights in Texas and access for women.
[nymag.com]
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: RgrF
Date: September 04, 2021 09:40PM
This afternoon Lyft sent the following email to it's customer base:

Dear Lyft Riders and Drivers,

A new Texas law, SB8, threatens to punish drivers for getting people where they need to go — specifically, women exercising their right to choose and to access the healthcare they need.

We want to be clear: Drivers are never responsible for monitoring where their riders go or why. Imagine being a driver and not knowing if you are breaking the law by giving someone a ride. Similarly, riders never have to justify, or even share, where they are going and why. Imagine being a pregnant woman trying to get to a healthcare appointment and not knowing if your driver will cancel on you for fear of breaking a law. Both are completely unacceptable.

This law is incompatible with people's basic rights to privacy, our community guidelines, the spirit of rideshare, and our values as a company. We are taking action on two fronts:

Lyft has created a Driver Legal Defense Fund to cover 100% of legal fees for drivers sued under SB8 while driving on our platform. Riders and Drivers: Nothing about how you drive, ride or interact with each other should change.
Texas SB8 is an attack on women's right to choose. Lyft is donating $1 million to Planned Parenthood to help ensure that transportation is never a barrier to healthcare access.

If you feel compelled to join us as an individual, you can make a donation here.
Logan and John, Lyft Co-founders
Kristin Sverchek, Lyft General Counsel

Unsubscribe | Contact
548 Market St., P.O. Box 68514, San Francisco, CA 94104
© 2021 Lyft, Inc.
CPUC ID No. TCP0032513 - P
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Racer X
Date: September 05, 2021 03:51AM
Quote
GGD
I wonder if every one of the people who were involved in creating this law have squeaky clean tax returns. Maybe some questionable campaign finance transactions? Tip lines aren't new, the IRS has one (actually a form, this is the IRS we're talking about), and another form to claim a reward ("bounty").

[www.irs.gov]

after my brother passed, I turned his boss in for paying everyone under the table. the IRS told me to get lost. useless twits.



********************************************
The police have no duty to respond. See Castle Rock v. Gonzales, 545 U.S. 748 (2005) or Warren v. District of Columbia[1] (444 A.2d. 1, D.C. Ct. of Ap. 1981)
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Ted King
Date: September 05, 2021 10:10AM
Quote
Lemon Drop
Quote
Ted King
Quote
Lemon Drop
Like everything, the burden falls on low income women. Wealthy women can get what they need regardless of where they live.

I found a couple of Texas non-profits that say they provide low income women with transportation for getting an abortion but they are both small outfits and I couldn't find any reliable information about how well they use donations. I wish I could find such an outfit that is known to use a big proportion of their resources to help those for whom the non-profit is set up to help (rather than a lot of the money going to administration and fundraising) because I would really like to give money for poor women who want an abortion to get one in spite of the new Texas law.

This is one good list. I've heard of many of them but haven't looked at 990s or anything like that on the smaller ones.

These orgs have a variety of missions and approaches but are all centered on womens reproductive rights in Texas and access for women.
[nymag.com]

Thanks. I had seen about and tried to check out Fund Texas Choice but couldn't find much information. Seeing it in that article reassured me that what little positive information I'd seen was probably valid. So I sent them a donation. I hope it helps some low income Texas woman get the help she needs. Thanks again.



e pluribus unum
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Re: Here is what I don’t understand about the Texas law
Posted by: Bill in NC
Date: September 05, 2021 03:03PM
Quote
DeusxMac
HIPA doesn't shield "criminal" activity.
Example: a psychiatrist MUST report to authorities, a patient who is a danger to the public.

If the "law" classifies an abortion as illegal, it cannot be held to be privileged information.



Caveat; I'm not a lawyer, this is just my understanding of HIPA.

The Texas law doesn't even attempt to do that...it only provides a course of action in civil court.

Of course, with the prez himself saying the DOJ is "looking into" what federal remedies there are, you'd be crazy to being an action unless you look forward to being on the receiving end of a federal civil or criminal proceeding...you know they're going to make examples.
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