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Comment:Apology, 800 years late for Hate Laws that dehumanized, expelled Jews from England
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: May 08, 2022 11:07AM
Yeah, legalized hate laws that still plague Jews today around the world

Apology, 800 years late for Hate Laws that dehumanized, expelled Jews from England

[www.thejc.com]

Physical attacks, collective imprisonments, mass executions, forced expulsions and a tightening noose of anti-Jewish restrictions. I’m not referring to Nazi Germany but England in the 13th century. Yet most people’s knowledge of this history is scant to the point of non-existent.

With the possible exception of the York massacre of 1190 and the Edict of Expulsion in 1290, the shameful chronicle of Jewish persecution in medieval England remains for many a startling blank.

Which is why a special service of repentance taking place this Sunday at Christ Church Cathedral in Oxford to mark the 800th anniversary of the Oxford Synod of 1222 is of both historic importance and contemporary relevance.

Organised by leading members of the local Christian and Jewish communities, the service constitutes a formal and public apology for the role of the English church in promulgating antisemitism in the 13th century and since.

Apologising for something that happened 800 years ago might seem somewhat irrelevant given the pressing challenges faced by global Jewry today. But this is to miss the point. The impact of the 1222 Synod was not only disastrous for the Jews of medieval England, it played a decisive part in the persecution of Jews throughout Europe for centuries after.

The Synod began on 17 April, the second Sunday after Easter and was convened by Stephen Langton, the Archbishop of Canterbury. Recently returned to England after his years in exile during the turbulent reign of King John, Langton was ablaze with reforming zeal. High on his agenda was the “problem” of the Jews, and in particular how freely they were intermingling with Christians. By the time the Synod concluded a few weeks later, it had passed into canon law a raft of anti-Jewish measures. These included banning Jews from building new synagogues, employing Christian servants, storing their property in churches and forbidding them “on any grounds to presume to enter churches”.

Obviously, all of these measures created many difficulties for the Jews in their daily lives. The ban on storing financial records and valuables in churches left them vulnerable to burglary, assault and looting in their own homes. The ban on Christian servants made Sabbath observance harder and deterred familiarity between Jews and Christians.

But by far the most egregious of the anti-Jewish laws of 1222 was that Jews wear an identifying badge. England was the first country in Europe to enforce this humiliating and degrading practice.

The Synod stipulated that the badge must be a representation of the tablets of the law given to Moses at Mount Sinai, consisting of “two white tablets on the chest, made out of linen cloth or of parchment … Two fingers in width and four in length”, and different in colour from the clothing it was attached to, so that “by their effect a Christian is able to discern a clear sign of a Jew”.

The Oxford Synod did not create antisemitism, but 1222 was a disastrous turning point in Christian-Jewish relations, as the Christ Church service this weekend rightly recognises. This was medieval England’s equivalent of the Nuremberg racial laws. It formalised Christian antipathy towards the Jews of England, enshrined it in Church law, and set the tone for the century ahead.

Accusations of ritual murder (the blood libel, another English invention) recurred with depressing regularity. Increasingly punitive taxation wiped out individuals and ruined whole communities. Civil war in the 1260s licensed widespread massacres. Further anti-Jewish legislation was introduced in every decade, each decree more vicious than the last, culminating in the final blow of 1290, the mass expulsion of England’s Jews. This too was an English “first”.

The unholy trinity of religion, politics and economy under Henry III and Edward I not only created a hostile environment for the country’s Jews, it forged a culture saturated in anti-Jewish myths, many of which are still dangerously potent today.
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Re: Comment:Apology, 800 years late for Hate Laws that dehumanized, expelled Jews from England
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: May 08, 2022 11:27AM
oh, but that was so long ago
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Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov says Ukraine can have Nazis, even though its president is Jewish, since, he claims, Adolf Hitler had Jewish ancestry.

“The fact that Zelensky is Jewish does not negate the Nazi elements in Ukraine. I believe that Hitler also had Jewish blood,” Lavrov said in an interview with Italian news channel Zona Bianca.

=================

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Re: Comment:Apology, 800 years late for Hate Laws that dehumanized, expelled Jews from England
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: May 08, 2022 11:34AM
[www.telegraph.co.uk]
Last year, the Church of England announced that it would, for the first time, offer an apology for the anti-Semitic expulsion of Jews from medieval England, which was welcomed by Jewish groups as “better late than never”.

The infamous Synod added a range of further anti-Jewish measures for the Medieval Church in England. The resulting canons forbade social interactions between Jews and Christians, established specific church tithes on Jews and imposed the need for English Jews to wear an identifying badge.

Bishop Croft told The Telegraph: “It’s deeply regrettable that the Christian church endorsed anti-Semitism in any way and participated in it.

“But that makes it all the more important that we keep these things at the front of people’s minds and awareness, and continue to build bridges between the different communities and strengthen interfaith relations so that we are all reminded of the need to work.”
Righting the wrongs of the past

The prejudicial laws were followed by further anti-Jewish statutes in the 13th century, culminating in the mass expulsion of the Jewish community in 1290.

By the late 1200s, a string of laws were passed in England restricting the rights of Jewish people. They were forbidden from owning land, passing on inheritance to their children instead of the Crown. Hundreds were arrested, hanged or imprisoned.

In 1290, Edward I passed the Edict of Expulsion, a royal decree which remained in place for the duration of the Middle Ages, expelling all Jews from the country. It was overturned only when Oliver Cromwell permitted Jews to return to England in 1657.

Despite the Church of England not existing in the 13th century – until its creation hundreds of years later by Henry VIII – officials have apologised for the role of the Church in England throughout history, and its part in stoking anti-Semitism.

Sunday’s event will be attended by Bishop Croft; the Chief Rabbi, Ephraim Mirvis; and the Bishop of Lichfield and the chairman of Trustees of The Council of Christians and Jews, the Rt Revd Dr Michael Ipgrave.
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Re: Comment:Apology, 800 years late for Hate Laws that dehumanized, expelled Jews from England
Posted by: RgrF
Date: May 08, 2022 12:49PM
Seems Rome ought to be the apologist.
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Re: Comment:Apology, 800 years late for Hate Laws that dehumanized, expelled Jews from England
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: May 08, 2022 12:56PM
Quote
RgrF
Seems Rome ought to be the apologist.

The Church of England has been a continuation of the same Jew Hating religious teachings.

But you are right, over a thousand years of hatred, torture and murder of tens of thousands could not have been accomplished without the teachings of the Catholic Church. (The Orthodox Church has the same foul story)
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Re: Comment:Apology, 800 years late for Hate Laws that dehumanized, expelled Jews from England
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: May 08, 2022 01:09PM
It acknowledged that cathedrals in Norwich and Lincoln were associated with the spread of the “blood libel” in the late Middle Ages, when Jewish communities were falsely accused of abducting and killing Christian children.

But the church’s effort to take responsibility for its part in Jewish persecution was blunted by stinging criticism by the Chief Rabbi of the continued “specific targeting” of Jews for conversion to Christianity. Some Christians saw Jews as “quarry to be pursued and converted”, he said.
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Re: Comment:Apology, 800 years late for Hate Laws that dehumanized, expelled Jews from England
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: May 08, 2022 02:01PM
[apnews.com]
After a two-year delay, the famous Oberammergau Passion Play is finally opening on May 14

The play — which for hundreds of years reflected a conservative, Catholic outlook — has received a careful makeover to become reflective of Germany’s more diverse society. It includes a leading Muslim actor for the first time and has been purged of the many notorious antisemitic plot lines which drew widespread criticism.

“The history of the Oberammergau Passion Play as being one which manifests these antisemitic tropes — Jews as villainous, Jews as deceptive, Jews as bloodthirsty, Jews as manipulative, Jews as Christ killers — was always part of the story,” Rabbi Noam Marans told The Associated Press in a recent interview in Oberammergau.

Marans, the director for interreligious and intergroup relations for the American Jewish Committee in New York, has been advising Stueckl together with a team of Christian and Jewish American experts for several years on how to rid the play of antisemitic content.

It’s been a success story. The play no longer depicts the Jews as Christ’s killers, and shows clearly that Jesus was a Jew himself. It places the story of Jesus’ last days in historical context, with all its intra-Jewish tensions and the Jews’ oppression by the Romans.
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Re: Comment:Apology, 800 years late for Hate Laws that dehumanized, expelled Jews from England
Posted by: Speedy
Date: May 08, 2022 02:16PM
Quote
Steve G.
Yet most people’s knowledge of this history is scant to the point of non-existent.

With the possible exception of the York massacre of 1190 and the Edict of Expulsion in 1290, the shameful chronicle of Jewish persecution in medieval England remains for many a startling blank.

Yes, even the two specifics are new to me.



Saint Cloud, Minnesota, where the weather is wonderful even when it isn't.
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Re: Comment:Apology, 800 years late for Hate Laws that dehumanized, expelled Jews from England
Posted by: Filliam H. Muffman
Date: May 08, 2022 02:32PM
The Church of England was Roman Catholic at the time. This is a little muddled with the current Archbishop of Canterbury being Anglican. I think The Catholic Church in England and Wales, the King/Queen of England (monarchy and government), and Rome (Pope and Church), should all be considered separate from Christ Church Cathedral/Archbishop of Canterbury, and might want to make their own apologies.



In tha 360. MRF User Map
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Re: Comment:Apology, 800 years late for Hate Laws that dehumanized, expelled Jews from England
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: May 08, 2022 02:45PM
sing along to The Ecumenical March with the Mitchell Trio from the 'That's The Way It's Gonna Be'

[www.youtube.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/08/2022 02:45PM by Steve G..
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Re: Comment:Apology, 800 years late for Hate Laws that dehumanized, expelled Jews from England
Posted by: Steve G.
Date: May 08, 2022 02:48PM
along similar lines from the same album
[www.youtube.com]
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